TOP
Image Alt

Utah Business

Signs.com Acquires Ferrari Color

Earlier this month, Signs.com announced their acquisition of Ferrari Color, a large format printing company headquartered in Salt Lake City. This acquisition adds manufacturing to a high-growth e-commerce platform, allowing for more streamlined production flow. This opens the door for new capabilities for Signs.com which will facilitate faster production times and more competitive pricing.

Headquartered in Salt Lake City, Signs.com provides custom signage solutions to businesses and consumers through an e-commerce platform. They do everything from lawn signs to window graphics. They have grown into the leading on-line company for custom signs and graphics. MountainWest Capital Network named Signs.com number one last year on their Utah100, the one-hundred companies in the Beehive State with the largest percentage of revenue increase in the last five years.

Ferrari Color was founded in 1978 and has been an industry leader for over thirty years. Specializing in large format printing, trade show, and in-store graphics, Ferrari Color provides digital-imaging solutions to clients nationwide.

Signs.com’s acquisition of Ferrari Color was prompted by a shifting market. Retail closures, change in buying behavior, and technological innovations demonstrate those changes. Both companies felt the importance of changing with the industry.

Nelson James, Co-Founder and COO of Signs.com, commented on the acquisition: “From the beginning, our goal at Signs.com has been to provide the best sign-buying experience available. We are confident that this acquisition will align with that goal by merging Ferrari color’s acclaimed experience and production with our own expertise in e-commerce and customer service.”

Kirk Green, CEO of Ferrari Color, agreed with that sentiment, adding Ferrari Color is “excited about the opportunity to combine the expertise of Ferrari Color and Signs.com into one strong and unified force in the marketplace.”

Signs.com Acquires Ferrari Color was originally published on Silicon Slopes.

Post a Comment