The Point of the Mountain Development Commission Seeks Input for Land Use The Point of the Mountain Development Commission Seeks Input for Land Use
The Point of the Mountain Development Commission Seeks Input for Land Use

Salt Lake City—The Point of the Mountain Development Commission, with the assistance of Envision Utah, will begin the Legislature-funded process to create a long-range plan for the Point of the Mountain area by asking the public a simple question: What’s your big idea for the area?

Utahns can visit pointofthemountainfuture.org to answer. This process was initiated by the Legislature’s Point of the Mountain Development Commission.

“The economic development opportunities surrounding the Point of the Mountain area represents a multi-generational, international opportunity,” said Christopher M. Conabee, co-chair of the Commission. Speaking to the Point of the Mountain Development Commission on Monday, Robert Grow, president and CEO of Envision Utah, said, “We hope everyone in Utah will think about the kind of place they want the Point of the Mountain to become, and share their ideas with us.”

The informal survey, available online through the end of the year, is the first of many opportunities Utahns will have to offer input throughout the Point of the Mountain visioning process. Individuals can also sign up to receive email updates about the project.

State Rep. Brad Wilson, co-chair of the commission, spoke about the importance of making this a collaborative effort. “We don’t want anyone to be left out. [Public involvement] is an incredibly important part of the process,” he said.

Speaking about Envision Utah’s plan to engage the public, Grow stated, “Trust does not come just from transparency, but from engagement and involvement,” he said. “The best thinking is going to come from the people and organizations already there and working on solutions to the challenges we face.”

The Utah Legislature’s Point of the Mountain Development Commission selected Envision Utah last month to assist the commission in its effort to create a strategic, publicly supported plan for the future of the point of the mountain area including the current prison site in Draper. The unanimous decision marked the end of a competitive four-month proposal process.